Dipeptide Library


Dipeptide and tripeptide libraries can be systematically constructed to contain almost all possible combinations of the 20 common amino acids.1 Peptide libraries can be used in the study of ligand-receptor interactions, epitope mapping, vaccine development, and drug screening.2 Dipeptide libraries, in particular, have been prepared to study a broad range of physicochemical properties, making them especially useful to pharmaceutical companies as a potential source for novel drug structures.3 Another advantage of dipeptide libraries is their simple structure, which eliminates the need for deconvolution in identifying novel structures and allows the peptides to be taken up by bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes for direct interaction with target proteins in vivo.3-6

AnaSpec, EGT Group is pleased to offer the following dipeptides.

Table 1. A list of dipeptides. Dipeptides containing N-terminal Glutamine or Glutamic acid are known to form pryoGlutamate (pGlu). The purity of the yellow highlighted peptides is expressed as a sum of both products (pGlu formation can vary from 20% to 50%), which is >95% pure by analytical HPLC.  Once dissolved in solutions, these dipeptides should be utilized fairly quickly. Grey boxes denote that the peptides are not available. Unless otherwise specified, all other peptides are >95%.

Dipeptides

AA

DA

EA

FA

GA

HA

IA

KA

LA

MA

NA

PA

QA

RA

SA

TA

VA

WA

YA

AD

DD

ED

FD

GD

HD

ID

KD

LD

MD

ND

PD

QD

RD

SD

TD

VD

WD

YD

AE

EE

FE

GE

HE

IE

KE

LE

ME

NE

PE

QE

RE

SE

TE

VE

WE

YE

AF

DF

FF

GF

HF

IF

KF

LF

MF

NF

PF

QF

RF

SF

TF

VF

WF

YF

AG

DG

EG

FG

GG

KG

LG

MG

NG

PG

QG

RG

TG

VG

WG

YG

AH

DH

EH

FH

GH

HH

IH

KH

LH

MH

NH

PH

QH

RH

SH

TH

VH

WH

YH

AI

EI

FI

GI

HI

II

KI

LI

MI

NI

PI

QI

RI

SI

TI

VI

WI

YI

AK

DK

EK

FK

HK

IK

KK

MK

NK

PK

QK

RK

SK

TK

VK

WK

YK

AL

DL

EL

FL

HL

IL

KL

LL

ML

NL

QL

RL

SL

TL

VL

WL

YL

AM

DM

EM

FM

GM

HM

IM

KM

LM

MM

NM

PM

QM

RM

SM

TM

VM

WM

YM

DN

EN

FN

GN

HN

IN

KN

LN

MN

NN

PN

QN

RN

SN

TN

VN

WN

YN

AP

DP

EP

GP

HP

IP

KP

NP

PP

QP

RP

SP

TP

VP

WP

YP

AQ

DQ

EQ

FQ

GQ

IQ

KQ

MQ

NQ

PQ

QQ

SQ

TQ

VQ

WQ

YQ

AR

DR

ER

FR

GR

HR

IR

KR

MR

NR

RR

SR

TR

VR

WR

YR

AS

DS

ES

FS

GS

HS

IS

KS

MS

PS

QS

RS

SS

TS

VS

WS

YS

AT

DT

ET

FT

GT

HT

IT

KT

LT

MT

NT

PT

QT

RT

ST

TT

VT

WT

YT

AV

DV

EV

FV

GV

HV

IV

KV

LV

MV

NV

PV

QV

RV

SV

TV

WV

YV

AW

DW

EW

FW

GW

HW

IW

KW

LW

MW

NW

PW

QW

RW

SW

TW

VW

WW

YW

AY

DY

EY

FY

GY

HY

KY

LY

MY

NY

PY

QY

SY

TY

VY

WY

YY




Reference:

1. Xiang, D. et al. Biochem 48, 4567 (2009).
2. Liu, R. et al. Exp Hematol 31, 11 (2003).
3. Xie, J. et al. J Med Chem 52, 3516 (2009).
4. Boden, P. et al. J Med Chem 39, 1664 (1996).
5. Olson, E. et al. J Bacteriol 173, 234 (1991).
6. Saito, H. et al. Am J Physiol 265, 289 (1993).